Laptop Ban on Planes to US Replaced by Tighter Security

The US Homeland Security Department has decided not to expand a ban on laptops in the passenger cabins of planes flying to the States. Instead it’s requiring tighter security measures for all aircraft and airports.

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The DHS made the announcement last week, saying the enhanced security standards would apply to all commercial flights to the United States. The 10 airports in the Middle East and Africa affected by the current laptop ban will have that prohibition lifted if they implement the new standards.

RELATED: How Hackers Can Ruin Your Vacation

The DHS had previously indicated that the ban, which applies to laptops, tablets and other devices larger than mobile phones, might be expanded to all flights from Europe. Later, it said the ban might be applied to all international flights to and from the US.

Homeland Security put the ban in place after intelligence revealed terrorists were developing an explosive that could be hidden in portable electronic devices.

In a fact sheet on its website, the DHS said the new security measures would include “enhancing overall passenger screening; conducting heightened screening of personal electronic devices; increasing security protocols around aircraft and in passenger areas; and deploying advanced technology, expanding canine screening, and establishing additional preclearance locations.”

YOUR TURN

What’s your preference while traveling; increased security and screening measures or an all-out ban? Sound off on the Union Built PC Facebook Page, or on our Twitter or LinkedIn feeds. And don’t forget to subscribe to the monthly Union Built PC UNION STRONG eNewsletter for articles, tips and guides like this delivered straight to your inbox. You may unsubscribe at any time.

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How Hackers Can Ruin Your Summer Vacation

From airports to hotels to that cute café you found, it just takes one cybersecurity slipup to turn your holiday into a nightmare.

It was the Summer Olympics in 1996 in Atlanta. Ken Spinner, then a systems consultant — and tourist in the city — lost his credit card information.

But this was more than two decades ago, so it happened the old-fashioned way: a mugging at the ATM.

Today, hackers can steal your banking and credit card information without leaving their couches. That’s particularly worrisome if you’re taking off for the summer. It’s peak vacation time, but it’s also the perfect season for hackers.

As Americans take more than 657 million trips between now and Labor Day weekend, they’re vulnerable to cyberattacks that steal their credit card data and personal information. For cyberthieves, resort hotels and airports make for lucrative hunting grounds.

FREE DOWNLOAD: The Growing Threat of Ransomware and How to Stay Safe

It’s no different from why thieves and pickpockets target tourists on vacation: They’re in an unfamiliar setting, they have their guard down and, more importantly, they’ve got money.

It’s like why people rob banks. That’s where the money is. When people go on vacation they use airports and stay at resorts.

From a cybersecurity perspective, hotels aren’t exactly bastions of relaxation. Over a three-month time-span surrounding the 2016 holiday season, more than 1,200 InterContinental Hotels suffered hacks. Malware has also hit President Donald Trump’s luxury hotel chain, along with Sheraton, Westin, Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt, Kimpton and Wyndham hotels — the list goes on.

In every one of those breaches, thieves stole credit card information from the hotels, leaving thousands of unsuspecting customers open to getting robbed. It’s not just your money these hotels are losing; addresses, phone numbers, names, and check-in and check-out times are all fair game.

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Because many hotels are chains, one breached location means hackers can break into the entire network for the mother lode of information. The stolen information can be sold online for up to $50 per account.

The majority of incidents start from a single employee at a hotel getting phished.

So even if your family takes all the precautions to keep your credit card information safe, and the hotel you stay at is safe, it could be a part of a compromised network. You could do nothing wrong and still lose.

Union Built PC feels hotels should invest more in encryption and in testing their security systems regularly.

RELATED: How Union Built PC Resolved the Cyber Terrorism Strike Against JATC Union Local 351

But the breaches don’t stop at hotels. Airports, coffee shops, beaches — any place with open Wi-Fi, really — should have you on the lookout.

Safe Travels

Don’t fret too much, though. There are still ways to keep yourself safe.

When you’re traveling, and don’t have your precious home or office internet access, be wary of any public Wi-Fi network you jump on. You might be setting yourself up for a man-in-the-middle attack.

That’s when a thief will set up a bogus hotspot, made to look exactly like the public Wi-Fi you wanted to get on, like the hotel lobby’s or the airport’s. When you sign on, you’re actually sending all your data to the hacker, without any warnings that you’re being compromised in plain sight.

It happens so frequently that in Singapore more people are afraid of using public Wi-Fi than public toilets.

Plus, people typically have their guard down when they’re on vacation. They won’t consider what the implications are if they go to a rogue Wi-Fi hotspot.

Without question, when on any public WiFi hotspot, avoid banking websites and online shopping. Anywhere you are entering your personal financial information. Always use an encrypted connection. 

RELATED: Protect Your Sensitive Data from Cyber Criminals with the Union Built Cloud

Going Electronically Naked

In some more extreme cases, consider going “electronically naked.” That means leaving every piece of technology at home: your phone, your laptop, your tablet, your iPad – everything! (It’s hard to conceive but read on.)

There are entire retreats dedicated to detoxing from digital life, so the idea of going on vacation without any technology isn’t as farfetched as you may think. Cyber Security experts most often go “electronically naked” when visiting China or Russia. This is where the majority of hackers emanate from.

Enigma Software took a look at cities in the US, Canada and Europe that have the highest malware infection rates. So if you’re heading to any of these cities, you may want to consider going electronically naked:

highest-malware-infection-ratesYOUR TURN

Has your personal financial data been breached? On vacation or otherwise? What happened? What was the resolution process like? We want to hear from you! Sound off in Comments, on the Union Built PC Facebook Page, or on our Twitter or LinkedIn Feeds.

And don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly #UnionStrong email newsletter. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Ransomware became three times as expensive in 2016

The average price to free your computer from ransomware used to be $294. It’s more than tripled in the last year.

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Ransomware averages at $1,077 per victim now. It might be cheaper to just do this.

It’s getting more expensive to keep up with ransomware.

As victims struggle to deal with cyberattacks locking up their systems, payouts are on the rise for hackers who target entire computer networks. Ransomware hides onto computers before encrypting important files, demanding victims pay up if they ever want access again.

RELATED: How Union Built PC Resolved the Cyber Terrorism Strike Against JATC Union Local 351

Throughout 2016, ransomware has become an increasingly popular malware for hackers, hitting San Francisco’s public transportation system, Congress and hospitals. As hackers find creative ways to extort money by holding computers hostage, ransoms are becoming less affordable while the malware becomes tougher to crack. In the near future, the average person might not even be able to pay off ransomware, even if he or she wanted to.

The MIRCOP ransomware demanded $28,730 from victims, the highest price seen during 2016.

FREE DOWNLOAD: The Growing Threat of Ransomware and How to Stay Safe

Two cybersecurity reports pointed at the startling growth of ransomware attacks during 2016. Ransomware attacks have increased by 50 percent in 2016 from 2015, now the fifth most common type of malware. In 2014, it was only the 22nd most common, according to this 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report.

The report also found that ransomware made up more than 70 percent of malware attacks on the health care industry, which includes hospitals, pharmacies and insurance agencies.

In 2016, Symantec found 463,841 instances of ransomware attacks, which rose from 340,665 in 2015. They also discovered 100 new variations of ransomware, tripling since last year. Over the last year, the security company found an average of 1,271 ransomware attacks each day.

RELATED: Protect Your Sensitive Data from Cyber Criminals with the Union Built Cloud

Ransomware’s rise comes from both how easy it is to share the malware, as well as how profitable the attacks are. When cyber criminals can share the software with each other and send out ransomware to infect systems in mass amounts through email, it’s a quick formula for an easy buck.

In 2015, the average profit for a cyber thief through ransomware was $294. Symantec found in its Internet Security Threat Report that demands have more than tripled, jumping up 266 percent to an average $1,077 per victim. Depending on how important the files are, it might be cheaper to just buy a new computer.

They can afford to raise the price when the majority of victims are willing to just pay the price. In the US, 64 percent of ransomware victims opt to pay the ransom, with the software often times being too difficult to crack, even for the FBI.

Attacks have become more sophisticated, going after entire drive systems as opposed to specific files to hold hostage. Ransoms can now also increase for every day it’s not paid, and some ransomware function as pyramid schemes, offering freedom if victims can infect two or more people.

RELATED: Why You Need Cloud Storage

YOUR TURN

Organizations like No More Ransom are fighting back against ransomware with free decryption tools. The group estimates that they’ve blocked cyber criminals from receiving more than $3 million in ransomware payouts since forming in July 2016.

Union Built PC is fighting back against ransomware by seeking to educate our clients, prospects, readers and followers. Backup is the Best Protection for your Data. We recently published a white paper to educate and guide you through the growing threat of Ransomware as well as information on Union Built Cloud services, a best-in-class secure data storage solution that automatically backs up your data keeping it out of the hands of cyber criminals. Use them and navigate the web with a lot more peace of mind.

Learn more about the Union Built Cloud, contact us with your cyber security questions and concerns and like Union Built PC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and subscribe to the Union Built PC monthly email newsletter for Union News delivered straight to your inbox.

Why Do You Need Cloud Storage?

Many people have heard about cloud storage but they don’t really know what it is and how they can use it. Not everybody has a background in IT that’s why it is completely understandable why the notion of sending your files to some cloud storage company is a bit daunting. However, using cloud storage has a lot advantages that you just cannot replicate with an external hard drive, for example.

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Let’s have a look at what you can do with cloud storage and why you might need it:

1. Cloud storage frees you from external hard drives

One of the best things about storing your data in the cloud is that it is accessible anywhere you go and where you have an internet connection (even in most developing countries that’s not a problem anymore). There is no need to carry and external hard drive around with you that a) could be stolen, b) could be lost or c) could break in any manner possible. With cloud storage getting your files is as easy as opening a web browser.

2. Sync your files across multiple devices

The best cloud storage solutions allow you to synchronize your files across your laptop, desktop and mobile device. What does syncing mean? Well, say you work on an important document at the office but you cannot finish it on time. If you save that presentation in your cloud storage folder it will be copied automatically to your mobile device and laptop so that you can finish it while commuting or at home.

3. Share & Collaborate

If you’re using a cloud storage solution for your files you can easily share files with your friends, family and colleagues. Just think about this: you’re on vacation with your children and spouse and you want to show your mother your beach house. Of course, you could upload your photos to Facebook but what if your parents don’t use Facebook? Just send them an email to a folder of your cloud storage solution and they can open it right away. Forget large email attachments that never arrive!

If you’re working remotely you can use those shared folders to collaborate with your team mates. Some solutions even allow to give special access rights to those folders.

4. Save cost

In many cases you can save quite a few bucks if you sign up for a cloud storage solution. Most of the time you will end up paying less than with external hard drives – also, your files are automatically backed up – not so on your external hard drive.

Automatic back-up of files recently became critical for one of our clients; JATC Union Local 351. They had experienced a ransomware attack that blocked their access to all files. With a cloud storage solution in place we were able to recover all files that were automatically backed up prior to the attack.

RELATED: How Union Built PC Resolved the Cyber Terrorism Strike Against JATC Union Local 351

5. Security

Many people are afraid about their files not being private. And rightfully so. Cyber Crime is on the rise and nobody is immune. In fact; 99% of computer users are vulnerable to cyber attacks simply as a result of everyday-software installed on your device(s).

RELATED: Protect Your Sensitive Data from Cyber Criminals with the Union Built Cloud

Now one could argue if you don’t have anything to hide it doesn’t matter – but again, we are not just talking about celebrities and the possible hacking of their private photos. We are talking about the vulnerability of your sensitive data, your social security number, banking and credit card information, passwords and more. Luckily, many cloud storage solutions have proper file encryption technology in place to protect your files from Cyber Criminals and third parties such as the NSA.

FREE eBOOK: The Growing Threat of Ransomware and How to Stay Safe

Like Union Built PC on Facebook, Follow Us on Twitter and LinkedIn and subscribe to our monthly eNewsletter for Union News and articles like this one delivered straight to your inbox.

Download the Union Built Cloud Brochure, Cloud Storage Solutions for Union Members and Offices.

Protecting Your ID When You’re Always Connected

With more and more of our time spent connected to smart devices, security is always an important factor to consider whether you’re working on files that live in the cloud, filing photos, or trying to get to the next level of your favorite online game. Your smartphone or tablet could be a target for a savvy hacker looking to capture your information. When you use a smartphone for all the convenience it can deliver (including mobile banking, document signing and sharing, and staying social), what steps should you think about to help ensure your security?

identity-theft

Using Apps Safely

As you look for applications to add into your smartphone, make sure you’re taking the legitimacy of apps into account before clicking ‘download.’ You can do this by reading reviews of apps that are unfamiliar to you so you’re in the know on issues that other users have experienced. Make sure, too, that you know and can confirm that the developer source is a reputable one. The good news for you is that app stores now have rigorous screening procedures to vet submissions, so they’re on the lookout to make sure your store shopping experience is safer and more intelligent than in earlier days.

Protecting Yourself Beyond Apps

Apps are a major window into device access, but hackers have commonly resorted to other increasingly sophisticated tactics to get into your information by email, too. Commonly known as phishing, these look-alike attempts to scam you out of your personal information by resembling communications that you do (or might reasonably do) business with. Commonly requested information: your Social Security number, account information, and passwords. As a reminder of something you probably are already familiar with, never give these out in email: reputable companies won’t ever ask for you to supply this information by email.

When it comes to taking your information with you on the go, mobile devices are unbeatable for convenience, portability, and staying connected. Just make sure that you’re keeping security in mind when you set up accounts, consider new apps, or access your information from another new place.

RELATED: Protect Your Sensitive Data from Cyber Criminals with the Union Built Cloud

This article is provided for general guidance and information. It is not intended as, nor should it be construed to be, legal, financial or other professional advice. Please consult with your attorney or financial advisor to discuss any legal or financial issues involved with credit decisions.

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The Common Typo That Can Steal Your Computer

The latest ploy cyber criminals are using to spread ransomware and other types of computer malware to provide them with remote access to your computers or to steal log-in credentials: After buying domain names with a missing or misplaced letter in website addresses belonging to well-known companies, they simply wait for you to make a typo.

The biggest threat results in the most common typos — either a misplaced or missing “c” (such as typing amazonc.om or amazon.om) so a web address ends with “.om” instead of “.com”.

Those two Amazon domain names are among more than 300 .om-ending domain names that hackers have purchased for this new malware-spreading scheme. Here’s the complete list, which also spoofs Facebook, LinkedIn, AOL, banks including Bank of America and Wells Fargo, pharmacies CVS and Walgreens, retailers such as Walmart and JC Penney, and even online porn sites.

FREE DOWLOAD: Ransomware: A Growing Cyber Threat

True, cyber criminals have long used website addresses with a missing, extra or misplaced letter to spoof those belonging to well-known brands for typo trickery. But the usual MO has been to lead consumers to copycat websites that sell counterfeit goods, aim to steal credit card info that people provide for supposed purchases, or promise a prize to those who complete a survey that actually mines for sensitive personal information.

RELATED: The Union Built Cloud: Protection You from Cyber Criminals

This new malware-spreading angle — called typosquatting — was discovered when researchers mistyped Netflix.om instead of the correct Netflix.com, and was redirected through a series of dubious pop-up ads and, eventually, to a malware-infested site that prompted him to download a file that appeared to be an Adobe Flash Player update. That familiar fake “Flash Update” usually serves up risky (and possibly malware-laden) pop-ups and other annoyances on computers, so don’t download or install it.

Researchers says that most of the .om-ending sites it discovered operate the same way: They don’t directly install malware but, instead, lead to other infected pages. So that’s good news, at least.

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In addition to .om-ending risks, other typosquatting tricks that may result in malware that gives hackers control of your computer and everything on it include website addresses with doubling characters (“googgle.com”), missing letters (“gogle.com”), adjacent keys (“googlw.com”) and letter swapping (“googel.com”).

RELATED: Cyber Terrorism: Why You’re Vulnerable

So carefully read what you type before hitting Enter to access a website, especially if you’re a fast or fat-fingered typist. That’s also a good practice to follow before clicking on links that appear in search engine results or online advertisements; they, too, may have typos that spell trouble.

Backup is the Best Protection for your Data

We recently published a white paper to educate and guide you through the growing threat of Ransomware as well as information on Union Built Cloud services, a best-in-class secure data storage solution that automatically backs up your data keeping it out of the hands of cyber criminals. Use them and navigate the web with a lot more peace of mind.

Learn more about the Union Built Cloud, contact us with your cyber security questions and concerns and Like Union Built PC on Facebook, Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and subscribe to the Union Built PC monthly email newsletter for Union News delivered straight to your inbox.

99% of Computers Are Vulnerable to Cyber Terrorism… Yes, this means you!

Did you know 99% of computers are vulnerable to cyber terrorism?

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Cyber security fact…

Oracle Java, Adobe Reader or Adobe Flash is present on 99% of computers. That means that 99% of computer users are vulnerable to exploit kits (software vulnerabilities).

Why?  Because the vulnerabilities that these types of software often present are extremely critical: all it takes is one click on an infected advertising banner to give a hacker full access to your computer.

Adobe Flash has a huge number of vulnerabilities, so cyber criminals target it in the majority of their attacks. By using these security holes in Flash, attackers can infect your computer with ransomware, such as various CryptoLocker variants or Teslacrypt and CTB-Locker.

FREE DOWNLOAD: The Growing Threat of Ransomware and How to Stay Safe

Without adequately protecting your browsers and your entire system, you’ll leave yourself vulnerable to a huge range of cyber threats.

How it affects you and what can you do to get protected:

  • Keep your software updated at all times (the experts say so, not just us) or install a solution that does that automatically and silently.
  • Keep your operating system up to date.
  • Install an AV solution and a supplement that can do what AV fails to do: protect your system proactively from cyber threats by scanning incoming and outgoing Internet traffic.

In addition…

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Social Media is a hackers’ favorite target!

Currently, according to in depth statistics, there are more than 1.6 billion social network users worldwide with more than 64% of internet users accessing social media services online. Moreover, social networking is one of the most popular ways for online users to spend their time, and a preferred way to stay in contact with friends and families.

This is precisely why cyber attackers love social media as well! Users that spend a lot of time on social networks are very likely to click links posted by trusted friends, which hackers use to their advantage.

Here are some of the most popular types of cyber attacks directed at social media platforms:

  • Like-jacking: occurs when criminals post fake Facebook “like” buttons to webpages. Users who click the button don’t “like” the page, but instead download malware.
  • Link-jacking: this is a practice used to redirect one website’s links to another which hackers use to redirect users from trusted websites to malware infected websites that hide drive-by downloads or other types of infections.
  • Phishing: the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by disguising itself as a trustworthy entity in a Facebook message or Tweet.
  • Social spam: is unwanted spam content appearing on social networks and any website with user-generated content (comments, chat, etc.). It can appear in many forms, including bulk messages, profanity, insults, hate speech, malicious links, fraudulent reviews, fake friends, and personally identifiable information.

Why are cyber attacks on social media so frequent?

Because social media users usually trust their circles of online friends. The result: more than 600,000 Facebook accounts are compromised every single day! Also, 1 in 10 social media users said they’ve been a victim of a cyber attack and the numbers are on the rise. Now this is a cyber security statistic which we don’t want you to become part of.

How it affects you and what can you do to get protected:

  • Don’t click any strange links.
  • Educate yourself about how cyber attacks look and work on social media platforms and learn how to protect your Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram accounts.
  • Install a solution that can protect you against malware and dangerous web locations.

No threat is too small, no protection is too strong

However big or small, cyber security threats should be treated with caution. You may not be a millionaire (yet) or a C-level manager, but that doesn’t mean that you’re protected against a potential hacker attack. Don’t spare any precautions you can take and try to develop your own protection system with the tools and information you find online, such as this list of cyber security facts.

Backup is the Best Protection for your Data

We recently published a guide to educate and guide you through the growing threat of Ransomware as well as information on Union Built Cloud services, a best-in-class secure data storage solution that automatically backs up your data keeping it out of the hands of cyber criminals.  Use them and navigate the web with a lot more peace of mind.

Learn more about the Union Built Cloud, contact us with your cyber security questions and concerns and Like us on Facebook, Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and subscribe to the Union Built PC monthly email newsletter for Union News delivered straight to your inbox.

UNION BUILT PC TOOLS AND RESOURCES

FREE DOWNLOAD:
Ransomware: A Growing Cyber Threat

The Union Built Cloud: Protection You from Cyber Criminals

Download the Union Built Cloud Brochure

Cyber Terrorism: Why You’re Vulnerable

5 Common Computer Problems and How to Fix Them